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Social Housing Developer Prepares to Open New Affordable Housing Project

Two housing projects are already on the table with hopes for more in the future to come out CBC News · Posted: Jun 20, 2019

Affordable housing developer Indwell is preparing to open the first of two rental properties in hopes of combating homelessness in the city.

Indwell is the largest affordable housing developer in South Western Ontario. They’ve provided affordable housing in communities such as Hamilton, Woodstock and Oxford county.


Innisfil Doing Well When It Comes to Accessibility, but Has Room to Improve

News 06:55 AM by Shane MacDonald
Innisfil Journal

Rick Winson, a member of the town of Innisfil’s Accessibility Advisory Committee, said the town is becoming more proactive when it comes to accessible buildings. June 13, 2019.

Rick Winson looks over the town’s building plans for accessibility challenges. In his own home, he has designed all kinds of accessible features. June 13, 2019.


Sudbury Raptors Fan Encounters Accessibility Issues

Molly Frommer, Videojournalist, Sudbury
@MollyFrommerCTV
Published Friday, June 14, 2019

A Sudbury woman just wanted to watch the Raptors game at a restaurant last night, but encountered some challenges.

Sarah Lashbrook has been in a wheelchair since she was fourteen in 1991, and says this isn’t the first time she has had to deal with a situation such as this one.


Toronto PreSchool for Kids With Disabilities Can’t Accommodate Staff Who Use Wheelchairs

Laurie Monsebraaten
The Toronto Star May 21, 2019

As a wheelchair user with cerebral palsy, Ashleigh Judge has faced barriers all her life. But the Toronto early childhood educator didn’t expect to be turned down for a job in a preschool that serves children with disabilities because the building is inaccessible.

“It’s not the first time I have faced this problem,” said Judge, 33.


Are ‘Accessible’ Walk-in Clinics Accessible to All?

ACCESSIBILITY MATTERS

Few ‘accessible’ walk-in clinics are truly
accessible to people in wheelchairs and scooters,
says the Ottawa Disability Coalition1 (ODC).

The ODC, whose mission is to build a community
in which persons with disabilities have equitable
access to the same opportunities as every other
Ottawan, was responding to concerns around
gaining access to medical care with the same
independence and dignity that able-bodied people
expect.