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AODA Resources

Resources on issues of accessibility and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)

The Right of Returning to Work

Under the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code), employers, landlords, and service providers must accommodate people with disabilities. In other words, organizations have a duty to make changes in order to meet the needs of workers, tenants, customers, or clients with disabilities. In this article, we will explore the right of returning to work after acquiring a disability.


Alternative Work

In our last article, we outlined some employment accommodations that workers with disabilities may use. Workers have the right to accommodations under the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code). In addition, the AODA requires employers to accommodate workers with disabilities. In this article, we explore the accommodation of alternative work.


The Right to Accommodation in Employment

Under the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code), employers, landlords, and service providers must accommodate people with disabilities. In other words, organizations have a duty to make changes in order to meet the needs of workers, tenants, customers, or clients with disabilities. In this article, we will explore the right to accommodation in employment. Workplace accommodation ensures that people with disabilities can work productively in an environment of mutually supportive colleagues.


Universal Design

Our last article explored the principles that employers, landlords, and service providers must follow when implementing accommodations. Among these principles are integration and full participation. In this article, we discuss how service providers can accomplish these goals of accommodation using universal design.


Principles of Accommodation

Under the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code), employers, landlords, and service providers must accommodate people with disabilities. In other words, organizations have a duty to make changes in order to meet the needs of workers, tenants, customers, or clients with disabilities. The right to accommodation ensures that people can work productively, live independently, and access services open to non-disabled people. In this article, we outline the human rights principles of accommodation. Accommodations that follow these principles create a society that respects all people.