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AODA Resources

Resources on issues of accessibility and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)

Information and Communication Accessibility Training

The Information and Communications Standards under the AODA and the Information and Communication Standard under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act both require organizations to make information and communication accessible to people with disabilities. Moreover, both standards require many of the same processes and practices to ensure accessibility. However, there are many important differences between the standards. The third review of the AODA recommends that the Ontario government should coordinate with other provinces and the federal government to ensure that accessibility laws are consistent across Canada. Therefore, requirements in the AODA may one day change to align with mandates under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act. In this article, we will explore Manitoba’s requirement for information and communication accessibility training.


Accessible Information and Communication Policies

The Information and Communications Standards under the AODA and the Information and Communication Standard under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act both require organizations to make information and communication accessible to citizens with disabilities. Moreover, both standards require many of the same processes and practices to ensure accessibility. However, there are many important differences between the standards. The third review of the AODA recommends that the Ontario government should coordinate with other provinces and the federal government to ensure that accessibility laws are consistent across Canada. Therefore, requirements in the AODA may one day change to align with mandates under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act. In this article, we will explore Manitoba’s requirement for accessible information and communication policies.


Web Accessibility in Ontario and Manitoba

The Information and Communications Standards under the AODA and the Information and Communication Standard under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA) both require organizations to make information and communication accessible to citizens with disabilities. Moreover, both standards require many of the same processes and practices to ensure accessibility. However, there are many important differences between the standards. The third review of the AODA recommends that the Ontario government should coordinate with other provinces and the federal government to ensure that accessibility laws are consistent across Canada. Therefore, requirements in the AODA may one day change to align with mandates under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act. In this article, we will explore requirements for web accessibility in Ontario and Manitoba.


Accessible Feedback Processes in Ontario and Manitoba

The Information and Communications Standards under the AODA and the Information and Communication Standard under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA) both require organizations to make information and communication accessible to people with disabilities. Moreover, both standards require many of the same processes and practices to ensure accessibility. However, there are many important differences between the standards. The third review of the AODA recommends that the Ontario government should coordinate with other provinces and the federal government to ensure that accessibility laws are consistent across Canada. Therefore, requirements in the AODA may one day change to align with mandates under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act. In this article, we will explore requirements for accessible feedback processes in Ontario and Manitoba.


Accessible Formats and Communication Supports in Ontario and Manitoba

The Information and Communications Standards under the AODA and the Information and Communication Standard under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA) both require organizations to make information and communication accessible to citizens with disabilities. Moreover, both standards require many of the same processes and practices to ensure accessibility. However, there are many important differences between the standards. The third review of the AODA recommends that the Ontario government should coordinate with other provinces and the federal government to ensure that accessibility laws are consistent across Canada. Therefore, requirements in the AODA may one day change to align with mandates under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act. In this article, we will explore requirements for accessible formats and communication supports in Ontario and Manitoba.