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AODA Resources

Resources on issues of accessibility and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)

Understanding Communication Devices

Under the Customer Service Standard of the AODA, service providers must communicate with customers in ways that take their disabilities into account. For instance, some customers will need information in alternative formats, such as Braille, large print, or accessible websites. Likewise, some customers will need to use communication supports, such as American Sign language (ASL) interpretation, speechreading, or captioning. In addition, providers must serve customers who use communication devices. In this article, we describe a few different types of communication devices.


Accessible Information in Customer Service

Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, providers must make documentation about their accessibility available to customers with disabilities upon request. This part of the Standards applies to all public sector organizations, and private sector organizations with twenty or more workers. These service providers must offer accessible information in customer service.

Accessible Information in Customer Service

Service providers need to create written versions of their customer service policies. They must outline their procedures on how they will:


Welcoming Customers with Assistive Devices

Under the Customer Service Standard of the AODA, service providers’ policies must state that they welcome customers using assistive devices. In this article, we describe what a few assistive devices are.

Assistive Devices

Wheelchairs

A wheelchair is one of the most well-known symbols of accessibility worldwide. Some people use manual wheelchairs which they wheel with their arms. Other people steer power wheelchairs that have batteries and motors. In addition to the wheelchairs people use every day, there are also wheelchairs for specific activities, such as:


Funding for Customer Service Accessibility in Ontario

The Customer Service Standards of the AODA give service providers guidelines on making their goods, services, and facilities accessible to customers with disabilities. Some of the standards’ regulations involve accessible building features or equipment. For instance, providers must train workers to use any devices or equipment the provider may have that help customers with disabilities access goods and services.  Likewise, providers must notify the public when services that customers with disabilities rely on are temporarily unavailable. Therefore, this article will look at different types of funding for customer service accessibility.


Online Customer Service Accessibility

The Customer Service Standards of the AODA gives service providers guidelines on how to start making their goods, services, and facilities accessible to customers with disabilities. While some guidelines in the Standard apply to service in-person, other guidelines apply to both in-person and remote service. Moreover, one of the most popular kinds of remote service takes place online. More and more organizations now give customers the option to do business over the Internet. Consequently, a provider’s website can be as important as its storefront. However, many organizations’ websites are not accessible for customers with disabilities. Providers can expand their consumer market and gain loyal customers when they ensure online customer service accessibility.