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News articles regarding the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)

Accessible Information at Work

Under the Employment Standard of the AODA, employers must provide accessible information to workers with disabilities through accessible formats or communication supports upon request.

Accessible information should include:


  • Documents or announcements available to every worker in an organization, such as:
    • Company newsletters
    • Health and safety information
    • Announcements of policy updates
    • Memos or word-of-mouth details about workplace social activities
  • What a worker needs to do their job, such as:
    • Presentations or videos

Accommodating Workers with Epilepsy

The Employment Standard under the AODA requires employers to accommodate workers with disabilities.  This article will specifically look at accommodating workers with epilepsy and outline the kinds of accommodations workers might need.

What is Epilepsy?

Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have seizures. A seizure happens when brain activity is disrupted for a few seconds to a few minutes. The kind of seizure a person has depends on which parts of the brain are affected.


Service Animals in Schools: Proposed Amendment to Legislation

The Ontario government has proposed an amendment to legislation that would simplify the accommodation process for students who use service animals in schools.

First, we provide a brief introduction to service animals and then we discuss how the proposed legislation could benefit children who use service animals in schools.

Service Animals

A service animal is an animal, typically a dog, that helps someone with a disability maintain independence. Service animals help people with many disabilities and medical conditions, such as:


Canadians will strive for a top spot at the World Wheelchair Basketball Championships

Canadians will strive for a top spot at the World Wheelchair Basketball Championships in Hamburg, Germany.  The men and woman’s teams will battle teams from around the world August 16-26, 2018. The competition takes place every four years.  It is also the largest international parasport event outside of the Paralympic Games. 
Belgium hosted the first official Men’s World Championships in 1975. The first Women’s World Championships took place 15 years later in France.  Canada has played an important role in the event. For example, Canada was the first to host the first-ever men under-23 world championship in 1997. Later, Canada hosted the first woman under-25 championship in 2011.
The Canadian men and women’s teams will have their first game on August 17th.   To begin with, the men are  facing off against Morocco. Then, the women will take on Great Britain.
 
Canada is sending two great teams to the event. Indeed, the twenty four athletes picked to play for Canada include fifteen Paralympians. Their experience will help the teams as they go for gold. Below, a quick look at each team shows their promise.

Team Canada Women

The woman’s team will defend their title from the 2014 world championships. They are the team to beat. Indeed, the team has five gold medals and two bronze medals.  Even more, they have reached the podium at every world championship since the first one held in 1990.  
 
The women’s roster includes:
  • Sandrine Bérubé – Beauharnois, Quebec

Remote Work to Accommodate Workers with a Disability

As an employer, you may receive an accommodation request that seeks approval for remote work. Indeed. remote work can be beneficial to both employers and workers. Below, we describe when remote work might be a good idea, such as when:


  • Workers with physical disabilities need equipment
  • A worker’s home provides more comfort
  • Workers need a distraction-free, quiet workspace
  • A worker with an invisible disability may feel less anxiety at home