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Enforcement

Hamilton Turns an “Oops” into a HUGE Mess!

The issues raised in the County of Brant and in Hamilton demonstrate a disturbing trend of using the Integrated Accessibility Standards for transportation as a tool to create an exclusive rather than inclusive society and the removal of independence and freedom that we’ve had in favour of attempting to imprison us in our homes and deny us services.

Read more at
http://enforcement.aoda.ca/hamilton-turns-an-oops-into-a-huge-mess/

“If an Ontario Human Rights Complaint is filed, we will stop providing Para transit” County of Brant

Karen McCall
December 4, 2012

Ironically on the United Nations International Day for people with Disabilities, the County of Brant Community Services Committee approved yet another variant to their unaffordable transportation scheme which ignores any of the Integrated Accessibility Standards for specialized transportation.

Read more at
http://enforcement.aoda.ca/if-an-ontario-human-rights-complaint-is-filed-we-will-stop-providing-para-transit-county-of-brant/

Restaurant Riles Stouffville Couple Denied Entry

Sandy Bolan | Nov 23, 2012 – 4:40 PM

Jim Brown, his wife Colette and two service dogs, Daisy (on his lap), a hearing alert dog and Shep, special skills dog were forced to leave the Bluenose Fish and Chips eatery in Markham. The owner later apologized. Staff photo/Steve Somerville ‘We made a big mistake’ restaurateur says


AODA: 2013 Compliance, Happy New Year!

By, Suzanne Cohen Share
November 21,2012

As of January 1, 2013 obligated organizations in Ontario have compliance requirements to meet in the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation (IASR) under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA).

Your obligations depend on whether you are:


  • 1. Ontario Government and Legislative Assembly
  • 2. Public organizations with 50+ employees
  • 3. Public organizations with 1-49 employees

Read AODA ALLIANCE’S Analysis of the November 2012 Final Report of the Andrew Pinto Human Rights Code Review

PINTO REPORT FINDS SUBSTANTIAL PROBLEMS WITH ONTARIO’S SYSTEM FOR ENFORCING ONTARIO’S HUMAN RIGHTS CODE, BUT WRONGLY PAPERS THESE OVER AND GIVES THE GOVERNMENT UNDESERVED POLITICAL COVER, BY ITS UNWARRANTED CONCLUSION THAT THE MCGUINTY GOVERNMENT’S 2006 PRIVATIZATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT IS A “QUALIFIED SUCCESS”

November 16, 2012
SUMMARY