Skip to main content Skip to main menu

Latest Headlines

AODA Training for Landlords and Other Workers in the Housing Industry

Currently, no AODA standards require houses and apartments to be accessible. However, the Third Review of the AODA recommends the creation of standards mandating accessibility in housing. AODA standards in housing could require AODA training for landlords and other workers in the housing industry.


Improved AODA Training for Long-Term Care Staff

In a previous article, we outlined the need for more accessible community housing for people with a variety of disabilities. Currently, the lack of appropriate housing within communities means that some young people with disabilities live in nursing homes. Future AODA standards in housing may one day mandate better community housing supports. However, until these supports exist, nursing home staff should know how to best meet the needs of residents with disabilities. In addition, improved AODA training for long-term care staff would help them create a more welcoming environment for retired residents with disabilities.


Improvements for Housing Allowances and Subsidies for Ontarians with Disabilities

Currently, many Ontarians with disabilities live in poverty. This lack of resources limits the choices people can make about where to live. Alternatively, people may prioritize housing needs, but have limited access to other resources, such as food. As a result, AODA housing standards should require improvements to housing allowances and subsidies for Ontarians with disabilities.


Best Practices for Supportive Housing

Our last article concluded that community-based supportive housing gives people with disabilities access to a high quality of life. When this housing is not available, people must often live in settings with unsuitable living conditions, such as nursing homes. In contrast, when people can freely choose the supports they need, they gain the freedom and independence to lead more productive lives and connect easily with others. As a result, AODA housing standards should require expansion of supportive housing in Ontario. In this article, we will explore best practices for supportive housing that AODA standards could one day develop into guidelines.


Accessible Community Housing

Currently, no AODA standards require houses and apartments to be accessible. However, the Third Review of the AODA recommends the creation of standards mandating accessibility in housing. These standards could start to reverse the current shortage of appropriate housing for people with disabilities within their communities. As a result of this shortage, many young people with disabilities now live in long-term care homes that captor to older adults. Requirements and guidelines in the AODA could mandate more accessible community housing, so that more people with disabilities could make positive housing choices.