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All posts by Greg Thomson

Awareness of Every-Day Accessibility in Ontario

In the third review of the AODA, the Honourable David Onley recommends needed improvements to the Act. One of these improvements is the need to help Ontarians become more mindful of accessibility. During public meetings Onley held while preparing his review, attendees stated that the AODA alone cannot make Ontario accessible. Instead, people and organizations must understand that accommodating people with disabilities is an every-day part of serving the public. Organization staff should expect to be serving customers with disabilities and know more about what these customers’ needs are. This knowledge will help them prepare to meet those needs in advance, instead of as an afterthought. Therefore, the government needs to develop opportunities to grow awareness of every-day accessibility in Ontario.


Definition of Disability

In the third review of the AODA, the Honourable David Onley recommends needed improvements to the Act. One of these improvements is the need for a new definition of disability within the AODA. This updated definition could help the public better understand what disability is. During public meetings Onley held while preparing his review, attendees outlined the importance of redefining disability.


Connections Between Disability Laws in Ontario

In the third review of the AODA, the Honourable David Onley recommends needed improvements to the Act. One of these improvements is the need to clarify connections between the AODA and the Ontario Human Rights Code (the CODE). During public meetings Onley held while preparing his review, attendees discussed the need for clear connections between disability laws in Ontario.


What is Accessibility

In the third review of the AODA, the Honourable David Onley recommends needed improvements to the Act. One of these improvements is the need for the AODA to clearly explain the meaning of accessibility. Onley’s review states that many people, including workers in businesses, wonder: what is accessibility? A definition of accessibility in the AODA could help them better meet the needs of people with all disabilities. During public meetings Onley held while preparing his review, attendees outlined the importance of defining accessibility.


Coordinating Accessibility Laws Across Canada

In the third review of the AODA, the Honourable David Onley recommends needed improvements to the Act. One of these improvements is the need to make accessibility law throughout Canada more similar. During public meetings Onley held while preparing his review, attendees requested government commitment to coordinating accessibility laws across Canada. In addition, Onley states that a 2018 federal law requires the Canadian government to work with the provinces on accessibility. As a result, Onley recommends that the Ontario government make the same commitment. In other words, the Ontario government should work more closely with the federal government and the governments of other provinces.