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All posts by Greg Thomson

Disability and Attitudinal Barriers, Part 2

In Part 1 of this article, we explored some attitudinal barriers that people with disabilities face. We considered how attitudinal barriers are often due to false assumptions people have about life with a disability. Here, we will consider more examples of attitudinal barriers, and how to remove them.


Disability and Attitudinal Barriers

Attitudinal disability barriers happen when non-disabled people do not understand how disabilities affect people’s lives. These misunderstandings can lead to false assumptions about what people with disabilities can do, want, or need. Businesses do not create attitudinal barriers purposely. Instead, barriers happen because businesses are unaware of how or why someone with a disability would access their services. In other words, attitudinal barriers happen because of stereotypes or lack of awareness.


Preventing Organizational Barriers

In Part 1 of this article, we explored how businesses can remove organizational disability barriers. For the most part, this process involves making changes to policies, practices, and procedures. Here, we will consider how businesses should be preventing organizational barriers in the first place.


Preventing and Removing Organizational Barriers

In our last article, we explored how organizational barriers limit access for people with various disabilities. In this article, we will consider how businesses can prevent or remove organizational barriers barriers. Preventing and removing organizational barriers makes businesses welcoming to people of all abilities.


Disability and Organizational Barriers

Organizational barriers occur when policies, practices, or procedures give people with disabilities fewer opportunities than non-disabled people. Businesses do not create these barriers purposely. Instead, barriers happen because businesses have not thought about how a customer or client with a disability would access their services.