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All posts by Greg Thomson

Recommendations in the Third Review of the AODA

Every four years, the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario appoints someone to review the AODA. Moreover, this reviewer spends time meeting with the public, especially people with disabilities. During these meetings, attendees discuss possible improvements the AODA might need. Based on this public feedback, the reviewer writes a report about how effective the AODA and its mandates are. In addition, the reviewer recommends steps the government can take to improve the Act. In this article, we list the recommendations in the third review of the AODA, published in 2019.


Barriers for Children with Disabilities

In the third review of the AODA, the Honourable David Onley recommends needed improvements to the Act. During the public meetings Onley held while preparing his review, attendees outlined many barriers that people with disabilities face. More improvements to the AODA would help to remove existing barriers and prevent future ones. Therefore, in addition to direct recommendations, Onley’s review also includes suggestions from attendees about how to remove these barriers. This article will explore barriers for children with disabilities and their families.


Disability and Poverty in Ontario

In the third review of the AODA, the Honourable David Onley recommends needed improvements to the Act. During the public meetings Onley held while preparing his review, attendees outlined many barriers that people with disabilities face. More improvements to the AODA would help to remove existing barriers and prevent future ones. Therefore, in addition to direct recommendations, Onley’s review also includes suggestions from attendees about how to remove these barriers. This article will explore disability and poverty in Ontario.


Reasons to Fund Accessibility

In the third review of the AODA, the Honourable David Onley recommends needed improvements to the Act. During the public meetings Onley held while preparing his review, attendees outlined many barriers that people with disabilities face. More improvements to the AODA would help to remove existing barriers and prevent future ones. Therefore, in addition to direct recommendations, Onley’s review also includes suggestions from attendees about how to remove these barriers. This article will explore reasons to fund accessibility, and strategies for funding.


White Cane Safety Day

Today is White Cane Safety Day!

White Cane Safety Day takes place around the world on October 15th every year. The day raises awareness about how blind people travel and celebrates how they contribute to their communities.

White Cane Safety Day

White Canes

White Cane Safety Day is named after the white cane, a tool many blind and visually impaired people use to travel. While they walk, they move the cane from side to side in front of them. The feel and sound of the cane on the ground or floor gives them information about what is ahead, including: